Showing posts with label Memorials. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Memorials. Show all posts

Thursday, January 7, 2016

Je Suis Paris ~ Je Suis Tel Aviv

Je Suis Paris / Je Suis Tel Aviv - a cardboard sign hung by French tourists at the site of two deaths, Dizengoff, Tel Aviv
A simple cardboard sign, written hastily and hung with tape says: Je Suis Paris, Je Suis Tel Aviv (I am Paris, I am Tel Aviv). A sign of solidarity for the two deaths earlier this week. Candles and flowers in sympathy of Israeli dead are common. This type of notices are not seen much. The Parisian tourists actually feel like they understand. The Paris terrorist attacks, from Chalie Hebdo to the recent Bataclan theater, are sadly bringing Parisians and Tel Avivians together. Strangely, I have not heard much from American friends and relatives. Some think the international media is playing down this incident. To some this may be "good news". Israelis are touchy about foreign criticism. They are even touchy about slight mistakes in reporting (the word spin is used often here) of terrorist attacks. Yet most Tel Avivians are just fine with international reporting of terrorist attacks. As terror spreads around the world, I am afraid there is not much to guide citizens in target cities. Here it comes to going back to normal life and remembering the places and people.
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Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Gawkers, Ignorers & Mourners

Memorial candles and photo of terror victim on Dizengoff Street, Tel Aviv, January 5th, 2016

I don't like writing or even discussing the painful events in Israel. There are Israelis which literally flaunt deaths and terrorism. As if it's a justification for something we are doing. But if you have gone through a painful event, or even been close enough to one, you change somehow. Israelis who lost children, parents, brothers or even cousins, tend not to flaunt the death of their dear ones. Deaths are public events just when they first happen. Yet quickly they become private affairs. No mother, brother or husband can share or bring into their life an outsider. No matter how close or how relevant their situation. Few endure the pain and make new relationships based on their loss. For the most part, once you lost a loved one, you want quiet after the first shock has faded. Three days after the deaths, the street slowly starts coming to life. A French couple, looks like tourists, hanged a small sign in solidarity to Tel Aviv residents. Seems appropriate in light of the events in Paris a few weeks ago.
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